Master's Theses

Date of Award

Spring 1963

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Psychology

Advisor

R. Dale Dick

Abstract

Twenty-nine S’s of high intelligence were paired with twenty-nine S’s of low intelligence according to their musical knowledge and training. A verbal preference and a behavioral preference was determined for four types of music, these were: classical, twentieth-century classical, popular and jazz. To determine the relationship between types of music preferred by the intelligence groups a test of significance was used. No differences of significance were found between the two groups. A correlation technique was used to determine which of the two groups, the high or the low intelligence, showed the most agreement between behavioral and verbal preference. When raw correlations are considered there is more agreement in the high intelligence group, when a test of significance is used there are no significant differences. The results of the present study do not agree with Rubin-Rabson's (1940) findings.

Rights

Copyright 1963 James Ryabik

Comments

Notice: This material may be protected by copyright law (Title 17 U.S. Code).

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