Master's Theses

Date of Award

Spring 2001

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Communication Studies

Advisor

Dr. Mahboub Hashem

Abstract

The surge of mass communication through technological advancement has raised the question of people’s apprehension to receiving the information they desire via electronic communication. Receiver Apprehension lessens a person’s ability to process certain types of information (Schumacher, B.K., & Wheeless, L.R., 1997). A representative sample at a mid-sized, mid-Western university was asked to complete a 27-item questionnaire using a Likert-type scale; 375 questionnaires were distributed. A model of the Receiver Apprehension Test (RAT), developed by L.R. Wheeless in 1975, was used for the measurement. However, seven added questions dealt with the Internet. The researcher was testing the hypothesis that people with high RA believe citizens, especially children, should be restricted while accessing the Internet and people with low RA believe access should be granted without governmental or filtering restrictions. It was found that the majority of sample participants were low in apprehension and preferred not to have governmental or filtering restrictions.

Rights

Copyright 2001 Amy L. Eck

Comments

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