Master's Theses

Date of Award

Fall 2001

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Psychology

Advisor

Carol L. Patrick

Abstract

The relation of substance use, religion, and gender to college students’ premarital sexual attitudes and behavior was examined. It was hypothesized that males would be more permissive in their premarital sexual attitudes and behavior. The third and fourth hypotheses stated that the amount of alcohol use would relate positively to the level of permissiveness in premarital sexual attitudes and behavior of individuals. The next two hypotheses examined drug use and premarital sexual attitudes and behavior. Hypothesis seven examined female alcohol users’ premarital sexual behavior versus female non-alcohol users, male alcohol users, and male non-alcohol users. The next two hypotheses examined level of church attendance and premarital sexual attitudes and behavior. The last two hypotheses were concerned with intrinsic religiousness and its relation to premarital sexual attitudes and behavior. The results found that there is not a significant difference between genders regarding premarital sexual attitudes and behavior. The amount of alcohol use does relate positively to the level of permissiveness in premarital sexual attitudes and behavior of individuals. The amount of drug use does not relate positively to premarital sexual attitudes of individuals but it does relate positively to premarital sexual behavior. Concerning hypothesis seven, there was not a main effect of gender, there was a significant effect of alcohol use, and the interaction between gender and alcohol use was not significant. The level of church attendance does relate negatively to permissive premarital sexual attitudes and behavior as does the level of intrinsic religiousness.

Rights

Copyright 2001 Mandy Crile

Comments

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