Master's Theses

Date of Award

Spring 1935

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Department

History

Advisor

Dr. R.L. Parker

Abstract

The early settler in Kansas seemed to have a penchant for establishing towns. Wherever a few settlers were gathered, though several miles apart, a convenient location found an enterprising storekeeper ready to sell. Soon this store became a gathering point. It was not long before a few dwellings were built around the store and it became a center for trade. A United States post office was established and a new town was born. Some of the pioneer towns were organized before the post office was established , some later, as a result of the mail center. I have chosen not to call a settlement a town until it had an established United States post office. Then, comes the question, does every post office mean that there was a town? Very often, yes; sometimes, no; but a positive stand must be taken somewhere. When is a town not a town, sounds like some old riddle, it must be decided, so, perhaps arbitrarily, I have chosen to say a place ceased to be a town when the post office was discontinued . However, this is not true in one or two cases which will be cited later. The aim in this thesis is to ascribe a reason for the establishment, life, and final abandonment of the lost towns as far as is possible with the time and materials available. The lost towns of Kansas are fast being forgotten as older inhabitants are passing. Some have already passed into oblivion unrecorded except by casual allusion in old letters, records, or locations on old maps.

Rights

Copyright 1935 Rebecca Wells Taylor

Comments

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