Master's Theses

Date of Award

Spring 1985

Degree Name

Education Specialist (Ed.S)

Department

Advanced Education Programs

Advisor

Wilmont Toalson

Abstract

The purpose of the researcher was to investigate how color analysis and its application effects the self- concept of individuals. The dependent variable was 10 subscales of the TSCS. The 10 subscales employed were: identity; self satisfaction; behavior; physical self; moral ethical self; personal self; family self; social self; self criticism; and self esteem. Also included was an Additional Question Sheet which included variables that could influence self-concept. The 186 female subjects were selected from four high school and eight university classes. The Solomon Design was employed and six hypotheses were tested at the .05 level of significance. The hypotheses were: (1) There will be no statistically significant difference in self-concept of the students who had and who did not have color analysis instruction as determined by pretest and posttest results, (2) There will be no statistically significant difference in self concept of the students who had and who did not have color analysis instruction as determined by those who had posttest but no pretest. (3) There will be no statistically significant difference in self concept of the students who had and who did not have color analysis instruction as determined by posttest results, (4) There will be no statistically significant difference in the pretest and posttest measures of self-concept for students who had color analysis instruction, (5) There will be no statistically significant difference in the pretest and posttest measures of self -concept for students who did not have color analysis instruction, and (6) Preceding draping there will be no statistically significant difference in the proportion of high and low self-concept students dressing in their season. The six hypotheses were tested employing the following analyses: analyses of covariance; analyses of variance; t tests; chi-square tests; and appropriate correlation coefficients. The results indicated none of the tests were significant at the .05 level.

Rights

Copyright 1985 Sharol I. Little

Comments

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