Master's Theses

Date of Award

Fall 1985

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Health and Human Performance

Advisor

Gary W. Arbogast

Abstract

The general problem of the present study was to determine the effect of an instructional wellness program upon lifestyle knowledge of fourth grade students, as well as to determine a similar effect on a significant other who was exposed only through a series of homework laboratory exercises. The subjects that participated in this study were selected form a population of fourth grade female and male students enrolled in the Unified School District in Hays, Kansas. Fourth grade class rosters were collected from each building principal, then 31 fourth grade subjects were randomly selected. The experimental group was comprised of five females and twelve males while the control group was comprised of six females and eight males. In an attempt to determine if teaching “overflow” affected the lifestyle knowledge of a significant other, it was necessary that one significant other form each family unit participated in the study. The Modified American Heart Association (AHA), Putting Your Heart Into the Curriculum Intermediate Level heart-health Test, was used as a measure of the individual’s knowledge achievement regarding lifestyle education. All subjects (experimental, control and significant others were pretested and posttested on the modified AHA knowledge test. The fourth grade students participating in the experimental group were exposed to a wellness program consisting of seven meetings covering the following content units: Physical assessment, cardiorespiratory endurance, nutrition, substance abuse, stress and relaxation, posture, and self-image and self-satisfaction. The statistical design used was an analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) to determine the effect of the treatment upon lifestyle knowledge. Analysis of the data revealed a significant gain in concept acquisition (p>.05) for fourth grade students participating in the experimental group. However, a data analysis revealed no significant gain in concept acquisition (p<.05) for significant others participating in the treatment, but teaching “overflow” was not observed for the significant others participating in the experimental group.

Rights

Copyright 1985 Kristie Lobb Divinski

Comments

Notice: This material may be protected by copyright law (Title 17 U.S. Code).

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