Master's Theses

Date of Award

Spring 1981

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Psychology

Advisor

Robert Markley

Abstract

Vascular response to cigarette smoking was measured by blood flow change by utilizing a photoelectric plethysmograph in 43 subjects. All subjects took part in a smoking control program consisting of self-monitoring for a two-week period. It was hypothesized that there would be a non- linear relationship between blood flow change and various measures of success in treatment. It was also hypothesized that a combination of predictor variables including blood flow change, number of years the subject had smoked, change in heart rate following smoking, age of the subject, and pre-treatment smoking rate would successfully predict success in this smoking treatment. A significant non-linear relationship was found between blood flow change and change in the number of cigarettes smoked from the beginning of the two-week treatment period to the end of the treatment phase of the study. Significant multiple correlations were found for the relationships of the pre-treatment smoking rate and magnitude of the blood flow change with post-treatment smoking rate and the smoking rate at four weeks after treatment.

Rights

Copyright 1981 Walter Hill

Comments

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