Master's Theses

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Date of Award

Summer 1969

Degree Name

Education Specialist (Ed.S)

Department

Advanced Education Programs

Advisor

Dr. LaVier L. Staven

Abstract

Continued study and extensive reading in the area of school administration indicated that a definite description of the responsibilities of the high school principal did not exist. It also became apparent that a specific graduate program of studies for principals did not exist. Existing graduate programs of studies were designed for school administrators and made no distinction in the preparation provided for principals and for superintendents. The procedure whereby a good teacher was encouraged to take a few courses in school administration and to take a position as a principal appeared illogical. Extensive training in specific areas of administration was needed. Since it was logical that a graduate program of studies should include instruction in areas which corresponded to responsibilities, a study was undertaken to determine the responsibilities of the high school principal. The study was divided into two parts, a review of literature in the field of school administration and analysis of responses to a questionnaire sent to administrators and college professors in Kansas. The questionnaire was divided into four parts, instruction, co-curricular activities, non-certified personnel, and a section asking for specific information about each school. The individual completing the questionnaire was asked to indicate the position in his school which had primary responsibility for each item given. They were asked to indicate more than one position if the item was a shared responsibility. The individual had a choice of six positions, superintendent, principal, assistant principal, counselor, teachers, and secretary, with administrative supervision. He could also indicate if some position not given was responsible. The questionnaire was completed and returned by ninety-one principals representing schools with enrollment of 150 to over 2500. The questionnaire was completed and returned by thirty-three superintendents representing schools with enrollment of 150 to over 1500. The questionnaire was completed and returned by five college professors teaching school administration in state colleges. The responses of these groups were compared to determine if the position of the individual completing the questionnaire made a difference in the responsibilities of the principal. The responses were also compared to determine if school size made a difference in the responsibilities of the principal. The results of this study revealed that the principal was responsible for fifteen duties in the area of instruction. These were: (1) set up master class schedule, (2) plan faculty meetings, (3) conduct faculty meetings, (4) observe classroom teaching, (5) conduct individual administrator-teacher conferences, (6) interview prospective teachers, (7) evaluate teachers, (8) evaluate curriculum offerings, (9) plan in-service training programs, (10) publish handbooks and information bulletins, (11 ) handle complaints from parents, (12) serve as a resource person for the faculty, (13) meet with other educators, (14 ) work with chronic problem students, and (15) meet with salesmen. In the area of co-curricular activities, the result s of the study showed that the principal was responsible for all aspects of the activities program in schools with enrollment of 150 to 399. In the area of non-certified personnel, the principal was responsible for supervision of general building clean-up and routine maintenance. This duty was shared in many schools with a head custodian. The study revealed that sixty-two principals received their latest degree from a Kansas college. The study also showed that the office of the superintendent was located outside the school building in fifty-eight of the ninety-one schools represented. Recommendations were made that would provide specific instruction in areas that correspond to the duties normally performed by the principal. This instruction, if added to the present program of studies, should provide a broader and more balanced training program for prospective principals.

Rights

Copyright 1969 Paul Temaat

Comments

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