Master's Theses

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Date of Award

Summer 1967

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Health and Human Performance

Advisor

Albert Hollister

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to compare (1) the level of health knowledge of selected Fort Hays Kansas State College students with national norms, (2) the level of health knowledge of prospective elementary teachers with the health knowledge of students in secondary education, (3) the health knowledge level of students who have had a course in School Health to those without such a course, (4) the health knowledge of physical education majors to secondary non-physical education majors, (5) the level of health knowledge of students from large high schools with those from small high schools, and (6) to determine the gain in health knowledge by one semester of School Health instruction. Research Methods: The subjects used in this study were 204 Fort Hays Kansas State College seniors and 67 students enrolled in School Health at Fort Hays Kansas State College during the 1963-1964 school term. The Dearborn College Health Knowledge Test was administered to the seniors in the education teaching block. The 67 students in the School Health class were given the test at the beginning of the semester and these students were retested at the end of the semester to determine the gain in health knowledge by one semester of instruction. Test scores of the School Health classes were compared by use of the correlated t-test. The uncorrelated t-test was used to compare the test scores of the seniors taking the test in the education block. The null hypothesis was tested at the .05 level of significance. Conclusions: Within the limits of this study the following conclusions were derived. 1. There was no significant difference between the level of health knowledge of elementary students and secondary education students. 2. Fort Hays Kansas State College student’s scores were significantly higher in health knowledge than the national norms. 3. There was no significant difference in the level of health knowledge of students with School Health and those without the School Health course. 4. Secondary non-physical education majors scored significantly higher in health knowledge than physical education majors. 5. There was no significant difference in the health knowledge of students from large high schools and those from small high schools. 6. There was a significant gain in health knowledge by one semester of School Health instruction.

Rights

Copyright 1967 Elise Hildebrand Brandyberry

Comments

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