Master's Theses

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Date of Award

Summer 1966

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Education

Advisor

B. W. Broach

Abstract

It was the purpose of this study to determine the preferences of mothers as to course content in all course areas: to determine the preferences of daughters as to course content in four course areas: to compare the preferences of mothers and daughters in the four course areas: to determine what implications the study has for the future planning and growth of home economics education in the Hays Junior and Senior High Schools. The survey method of research was used for the study. A questionnaire was prepared and mailed to all mothers of girls in grades seven through twelve. The same questionnaire was given to all girls enrolled in home economics and in school on April 14, 1966. A total of 360 questionnaires were tabulated to obtain the data needed for the study. The questionnaires represented preferences of 184 mothers and 176 girls. The following general conclusions relative to the preferences of mothers and daughters as to course content are based on the results of this study: 1. Mothers and daughters are in essential agreement as to the learning experiences in all course areas, with one exceptions the study of textiles as a part of the learning experiences included in the area of clothing is not favored by the girls. 2. Mothers and daughters are in complete agreement when considering the value of home economics courses. 3. Girls do not enroll in home economics courses, although desired, because of lack of time in their schedules of classes due to the demands made by a college preparatory course. 4. Mothers and daughters desire summer home economics courses so that desired courses may be had while following a college preparatory course. 5. Mothers and daughters approve of home economics courses because students can learn manipulative skills. 6. Mothers approve a home economics course for boys emphasizing foods and the care of clothing. 7. Mothers and daughters favor home economics as a required course for girls in junior and senior high school. 8. Mothers who had taken home economics in high school and had a satisfying experience considered the courses most valuable and useful of those taken in high school. 9. Mothers who had had home economics courses in high school where theory was stressed over skills found the courses unsatisfactory. 10. There is an increased interest in home economics courses at Hays Junior and Senior High Schools. The following implications are drawn from the conclusions of the study for the future planning and growth of the home economics curriculum at Hays Junior and Senior High Schools, 1. Home economics courses should stress the practical application of knowledge and develop manipulative skills. 2. Home economics courses in the summer should be a part of the curriculum of Hays High School if the needs of all students are to be met. 3. The boy’s foods class should include clothing care. 4. Adult education courses might be considered in the area of clothing. 5. Home economics should be a required course for girls in the junior and senior high schools. 6. The facilities of the home economics departments will have to be expanded 1f needs of an increased enrollment are to be met. In view of the limitations of the present study, the following recommendations for further study are made 1. An evaluation be made of the value of specific learnings in course areas by a survey of graduates of the high school who had taken home economics courses. 2. A survey be made of mothers to determine the feasibility of an adult home economics course. 3. An evaluation be made of the present facilities of the home economics departments of the Hays Junior and Senior High Schools to determine needs in view of increased enrollment. It is further recommended that the results of these findings be presented to the school board of Hays Unified District 489 for its consideration.

Rights

Copyright 1966 Georganna Grass Johnson

Comments

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