Master's Theses

Date of Award

Spring 1965

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Psychology

Advisor

David E. Proctor

Abstract

This study investigated the relationships between open-mindedness and learning and thinking. Fifty-five subjects were taken from General Psychology classes. They were given Haiman's Revised Scale for the measurement of Open-mindedness, a Stimulus-Response task, a Concept Formation task, the Watson-Glaser Critical Thinking Appraisal, and their ACT scores were obtained for comparison with the three performance tasks and scores on the Open-mindedness measure. It was hypothesized that closed-mindedness was negatively related to learning and thinking. The results offered partial support for the hypothesis. Poor performance on Stimulus-Response learning was positively related to closed-mindedness. Ability to think critically was negatively related to closed-mindedness, whereas ability to form concepts proved to be positively related to closed-mindedness. This suggested that whatever interference closed-mindedness has with learning may be evident only in certain conditions. However, some shortcomings in the methodology used with the Concept Formation task are pointed out. Suggestions for future research are offered.

Rights

Copyright 1965 Arthur Palmer

Comments

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