Master's Theses

Date of Award

Summer 1964

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Psychology

Advisor

Kenneth E. Smoot

Abstract

This research was designed to investigate the relationship between anxiety level as measured by the Taylor Manifest Anxiety Scale and the willingness of individuals to cooperate in a two-person non-zero-sum game. The subjects consisted of 32 “high anxiety” and 32 “low anxiety” General Psychology students. These 64 individuals were divided into two groups on the basis of sex, and each sex group was subdivided into four groups as follows: “high anxiety” playing against “high anxiety” (HH), “high anxiety” playing against “low anxiety” (HL), “low anxiety” playing against “high anxiety” (LH), and “low anxiety” playing against “low anxiety” (LL). All individuals were scored with respect to their demonstrated cooperativeness, and an analysis of variance was done utilizing all data. This analysis revealed no reliable between groups effects. Chi square analyses indicated that a significant predominance of competitive responses did not increase significantly from the “low anxiety” to the “high anxiety” group. It was also found that the variance for “high anxiety” subjects was not significantly greater than the variance for “low anxiety” subjects. There were, however, gross behavioral and attitudinal differences between the “high anxiety” and “low anxiety” group. These differences were observed primarily in the initial conversation between each subject and the experimenter.

Rights

Copyright 1964 Ronald W. Gates

Comments

Notice: This material may be protected by copyright law (Title 17 U.S. Code).

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