Master's Theses

Date of Award

Spring 1961

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Art

Advisor

Dr. Joel C. Moss

Abstract

The actual essence of the creator’s objective was to able to visualize beauty of nature through the use of metal, may it be expressing something of infinity or for only a season, perhaps bold or minute. Growth and decay, both having beauty in their own right, and both having a time of visual existence, suggested ideas to the sculptor. The flexibility of welding rod best expresses the beauty of nature for the sculptor rather than sheet steel because he was able to obtain a growth-like quality of nature, not only of plant life, but of growth and decay of nature herself. The sculptor also found that accidents which occur in some mediums were not experienced in the use of metal; thus he believes that the experiences which he has had were pure experiences. Unlike water color, ceramic glazes, or some graphic processes which can produce effects contrary to the creator’s ideas, welding with steel produces only that which the creator intends. “Varied Passage”, the third sculpture which the sculptor developed seemed to create more difficulty than any other sculptural form. Perhaps the problem arose because of the sculptor’s attempt to express the same theme, that of recline, in another form. Not until “Varied Passage” was completed did it become evident that a previous piece, “Formation”, more clearly communicated the sculptor’s feelings concerning this theme. Through intense study of the materials used by the sculptor, he was better able to use ideas, thoughts, and personal emotions which were suggested to him by previous works he had done. Such suggestions as textures, line, and space helped provide ideas for the different pieces created for this study. The development of expressions of nature, may it be something concerning growth or decay, or both, is something which could be approached in many different ways. The sculptor believes that creating a sculpture using some interpretation of a facet of nature is best done through the use of a material such as steel which offers the variation of form and tensile strength associated with nature.

Rights

Copyright 1961 Robert H. Chism

Comments

Notice: This material may be protected by copyright law (Title 17 U.S. Code).

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