Master's Theses

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Date of Award

Summer 1959

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Education

Advisor

Committee Chair

Abstract

The purpose of this report was to make a comparative study of selected legislative provisions and to give emphasis to Kansas’ position in that comparison. A form letter was composed which would provide complete coverage (as nearly as possible) of the state’s legislation and board of education rulings. This letter was then printed and mailed out to each of the state’s superintendents of education. Answers were eventually received from all the states. There were five general areas in which comparisons were made. These were: (1) personal attributes of the special education teacher, (2) general qualifications of the special education teacher, (3) special qualifications of the special education teacher, (4) required or suggested courses for the special education teacher, and (5) areas of exceptionality for which legislative provisions provide. Only ten of the states listed personal attributes essential for the special education teacher to possess. Kansas was one of these ten. The area of general qualifications for the special education teacher was divided into four sections for convenient comparison via tabulation. These four sections were: previous teaching experience, regular teacher certification, a bachelor’s degree, and additional hours of course work. The findings revealed that Kansas was one of the six states demanding all four of these requirements. There were thirty-one states demanding certain specific qualifications of the teachers in the various specialized fields. These demands were in addition to the general qualifications. Here again Kansas was found to figure prominently in thoughtfully planned requirements, and was the only state to demand as many as forty-two hours of special training of the speech correctionists. These demands were given detailed elaboration in the fourth section of the report findings. There were eleven areas of exceptionality considered in the various states legislation. Kansas provides for nine of these areas. The tabulation form of reporting these findings was used whenever possible to provide ease in making specific comparisons between states. The writer hopes that this report may prove helpful and informative to present and future students in special education, as well as interesting to those persons now serving in this field.

Rights

Copyright 1959 Wilma Corn

Comments

Notice: This material may be protected by copyright law (Title 17 U.S. Code).

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