Master's Theses

Date of Award

Summer 1944

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Biology

Advisor

Dr. F.W. Albertson

Abstract

The principal occupation of the inhabitants in the Great Plains Region is livestock farming. The problems confronting the farmers and ranchers of this large area are many and varied. Not the least of these problems is the one of a proper stocking rate for the various types of ranges in order to secure a maximum production with the least in capital outlay and range deterioration. Another problem that has presented itself in recent years is the one of revegetating thousands of acres of marginal and semi-marginal land so that mother nature may again heal the marks of erosion and bring the land back into productivity (Great Plains Committee, 1936). This phase of the problem has been recommended by various governmental agencies such as the Agricultural Conservation Program and the Soil Conservation Service. The former agency has encouraged the reseeding of farm land by making payments for the return of cultivated land to natural vegetation. There are still many thousands of acres that should be reseeded to grasses in this region in order to afford protection for the soil. If a good cover of highly palatable forage is to be maintained, the question of proper stocking needs further consideration. The purpose of this investigation, therefore, was to determine what species of grasses and forbs the cattle preferred under different intensities of grazing and the reason for their preference.

Rights

Copyright 1944 Noel Runyon

Comments

Notice: This material may be protected by copyright law (Title 17 U.S. Code).

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