Master's Theses

Date of Award

Spring 2009

Degree Name

Master of Science in Nursing (MSN)

Department

Nursing

Advisor

Dr. Liane Connelly

Abstract

Significant attention has been brought to the safety of medical and nursing care in acute-care hospitals, but nursing homes are not immune to errors that result in injury (Kapp, 2003). Errors, even minor ones, can have significant impact in this population group of aged, frail individuals (Scott-Cawiezell, et al., 2006). Nursing home residents do not wear an identification device for varied reasons. This places an extra burden on those passing medications to ensure they have the right person receiving the right medication. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationships between variables with the resident’s willingness to wear an identification device. The variables selected were: (a) the resident’s quality of life, (b) the resident’s perception of his/her environmental domain, and (c) the resident’s willingness to wear an identification device. A non-experimental, correlational design was used. Inferential statistics using Spearman’s rho was used to determine correlations between the variables. Chi-square was used to determine differences between male and female responses. A convenience sample (N = 53) included residents from seven nursing homes in two Midwestern states. Research question number one was, “What is the relationship, if any, between a nursing home resident’s quality of life and his/her willingness to wear an identification device?” There was an insignificant, inverse correlation and the result was not significant, rs(51) = -.058, p > .05. Research question number two was, “What is the relationship, if any, between a nursing home resident’s perception of the environmental domain and his/her willingness to wear an identification device?” An insignificant correlation was found and the result was not significant, rs(51) = .165, p > .05. The third research question was, “What are the differences, if any, between gender of nursing home residents and their willingness to wear an identification device?” No significant difference was found between the variables, X2(1) = .331, p > .05. This investigation found no significant correlation between nursing home residents’ perceptions of quality of life and environment and willingness to wear and identification device, nor were there significant differences between male and female participants.

Rights

Copyright 2009 William Rhoads

Comments

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Nursing Commons

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