Master's Theses

Date of Award

Summer 2008

Degree Name

Master of Science in Nursing (MSN)

Department

Nursing

Advisor

Dr. Karyolyn Kells

Abstract

American Nurses Credentialing Center’s (ANCC, 2004) Magnet Recognition Program© identifies collaborative working relationships as essential. Exploring any potential barriers to collaboration is necessary. Nurses new to the profession may lack or have a varying degree of role confidence. Nurses need to be prepared to work at the collaborative bedside. Does a confident nurse assist in closing the gap in nurse-physician collaboration? The purpose of this investigation was to identify and describe the relationship between a nurses’ role confidence and nurse-physician collaboration. The convenience sample (N=90) consisted of RNs working in an acute care setting in a mid-western state. The variables were: (a) Nurse Role Confidence defined by the Nurse Self-concept subscale, the Caring subscale and the Knowledge subscale of the Nurse Self Concept Questionnaire (NSCQ) (Cowin, 2001), (b) Nurse-physician Collaboration defined by the Collaboration with Medical Staff Scale (CMSS) (Adams, Bond & Arber, 1995), (c) RN participant age, (d) RN participant years of nursing experience, and (e) RN unit worked. “Is there a statistically significant correlation between nurse role confidence and nurse perception of nurse-physician collaboration?” was the first research question. A correlation was performed with the NSCQ three selected subscales. The Caring subscale showed a statistically significant correlation with Nurse-physician collaboration. The Nurse Self-concept and Knowledge subscales were not statistically significant. The second research question, “Is there a statistically significant correlation between nurse role confidence and nurse age?” correlated the Nurse Self-concept, Caring and Knowledge subscales with nurse age. No statistically significant correlation was present. The third question was “Is there a statistically significant correlation between nurse role confidence and number of years of nursing experience?” This question correlated Nurse Self-concept, Caring and Knowledge subscales with years nursing experience. No statistically significant correlation was present. The final question was, “Is there a statistically significant difference between nurse role confidence by unit worked?” No statistically significant difference was found between unit worked and the subscales of Nurse Self-concept, Caring and Knowledge. Nurse role confidence, as defined in this investigation was not shown to have a positive correlation with nurse-physician collaboration. The Caring subscale provided a statistically significant correlation with nurse-physician collaboration. Future research for factors that impact collaboration is recommended.

Rights

Copyright 2008 Lisa Alexander

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