Master's Theses

Document Type

Thesis - campus only access

Date of Award

Summer 2008

Degree Name

Master of Science in Nursing (MSN)

Department

Nursing

Advisor

Dr. Karyolyn Kells

Abstract

American Nurses Credentialing Center’s (ANCC, 2004) Magnet Recognition Program© identifies collaborative working relationships as essential. Exploring any potential barriers to collaboration is necessary. Nurses new to the profession may lack or have a varying degree of role confidence. Nurses need to be prepared to work at the collaborative bedside. Does a confident nurse assist in closing the gap in nurse-physician collaboration? The purpose of this investigation was to identify and describe the relationship between a nurses’ role confidence and nurse-physician collaboration. The convenience sample (N=90) consisted of RNs working in an acute care setting in a mid-western state. The variables were: (a) Nurse Role Confidence defined by the Nurse Self-concept subscale, the Caring subscale and the Knowledge subscale of the Nurse Self Concept Questionnaire (NSCQ) (Cowin, 2001), (b) Nurse-physician Collaboration defined by the Collaboration with Medical Staff Scale (CMSS) (Adams, Bond & Arber, 1995), (c) RN participant age, (d) RN participant years of nursing experience, and (e) RN unit worked. “Is there a statistically significant correlation between nurse role confidence and nurse perception of nurse-physician collaboration?” was the first research question. A correlation was performed with the NSCQ three selected subscales. The Caring subscale showed a statistically significant correlation with Nurse-physician collaboration. The Nurse Self-concept and Knowledge subscales were not statistically significant. The second research question, “Is there a statistically significant correlation between nurse role confidence and nurse age?” correlated the Nurse Self-concept, Caring and Knowledge subscales with nurse age. No statistically significant correlation was present. The third question was “Is there a statistically significant correlation between nurse role confidence and number of years of nursing experience?” This question correlated Nurse Self-concept, Caring and Knowledge subscales with years nursing experience. No statistically significant correlation was present. The final question was, “Is there a statistically significant difference between nurse role confidence by unit worked?” No statistically significant difference was found between unit worked and the subscales of Nurse Self-concept, Caring and Knowledge. Nurse role confidence, as defined in this investigation was not shown to have a positive correlation with nurse-physician collaboration. The Caring subscale provided a statistically significant correlation with nurse-physician collaboration. Future research for factors that impact collaboration is recommended.

Comments

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Rights

Copyright 2008 Lisa Alexander

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