Master's Theses

Date of Award

Summer 2005

Degree Name

Education Specialist (Ed.S)

Department

Advanced Education Programs

Advisor

Steven Duvall

Abstract

Despite the growing number of students with disabilities receiving an increasing share of their education in inclusive classrooms, there is little evidence that inclusion increases academic responding or social interactions. The current observational study involved six 5th grade male students, four of whom had been identified as having learning disabilities (LD) and two whom had not been identified with any exceptionality. Two of the students with LD received instruction in a resource room, an inclusion classroom, and in a general education classroom without services. Two other students with LD received instruct ion in a resource room and in general education. The two general education students received instruction in an inclusion classroom and in a general education classroom. The purpose of this study was to record and analyze academic engagement and social interactions for the students across the various educational settings. Within an alternating treatments design, the results indicated that the students with LD exhibited a greater degree of academic responding and fewer behaviors that would interfere with academic responding in the resource room, as opposed to inclusion or the general education setting. The students with LD had their highest degree of social interactions in the resource room and the least amount in the general education setting. Implications regarding the results and future research were discussed.

Rights

Copyright 2005 Brett Murray

Comments

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