Master's Theses

Date of Award

Summer 2004

Degree Name

Education Specialist (Ed.S)

Department

Psychology

Advisor

Stephen Kitzis

Abstract

Inclusion is generally described as the placement of a child with a disability with his/her chronological age peers in a regular education classroom. Advocates of inclusion believe that students with exceptionalities will benefit academically and socially in a learning environment where they are served alongside normally achieving students. However, critics of inclusion are concerned with how comfortable all students feel when students with disabilities are in the classroom, and believe that students with disabilities have low self-perceptions and are socially isolated from their peers. The effect of students with varying levels of ADHD symptoms on the behavior of regular education students was investigated in this study. Participants included 3 middle school students diagnosed with ADHD and 117 randomly selected regular education students. Observations were made using EBASS for an overall total of 3,435 observation entries. Data were collected every 20 seconds with both the ADHD students and regular education students being observed simultaneously. Results indicated that the competing responses of ADHD students had no correlation with the regular education students’ rate of academic responding. The results also indicated that the grade level had a greater impact on the regular education students’ behavior than the ADHD students’ range of symptoms.

Rights

Copyright 2004 Christina Robben.

Comments

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