Master's Theses

Date of Award

Summer 1997

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Social Work

Advisor

Bill Daley

Abstract

The purpose of the researcher was to investigate marital satisfaction. Information pertaining to the independent variables were taken from the Marital Quality Questionnaire. The following independent variables were investigated: socioeconomic background, educational attainment, religious commitment, whether the couple obtained premarital counseling, the timing of the sessions, number of premarital counseling sessions obtained, global satisfaction, and marital status. Scores from the following subscales of the Dyadic Adjustment Scale (DAS) by Graham Spanier were used as the [dependent] variables: Dyadic Consensus, Dyadic Cohesion, Dyadic [illegible], Affectional Expression, and Total or Dyadic Adjustment. Four composite null hypotheses were tested at the .0500 level employing a three-way analysis of variance (general linear model). One composite null hypothesis was tested at the .0500 level employing a one-way analysis of variance. The total sample consisted of 16 respondents who were single, 30 who were married, 6 divorced or separated persons, and 7 remarried subjects. The total sample size was 59. Of the 59 questionnaires completed, 8 were by males. There were 24 additional questionnaires which were not included in the research due to incomplete data. A total of 100 comparisons were made plus 25 recurring. Of the 100 comparisons 45 were for main effects and 55 for interactions. Of the 45 main effects 8 were statistically significant at the .0500 level. None of the 55 interactions was statistically significant at the .0500 level. The results of the present study appeared to support the following generalizations: l. married students who reported they would remarry the same person have greater dyadic consensus satisfaction than those who would not remarry the same person: 2. married students who reported they would remarry the same person have greater dyadic cohesion satisfaction than those who would not remarry the same person: 3. married students who reported they would remarry the same person or were undecided have greater dyadic satisfaction than those who would not remarry the same person: 4. married students who reported they would remarry the same person or were undecided have greater affectional expression than those who would not remarry the same person: 5. married students who reported they would remarry the same person or were undecided have greater total or dyadic adjustment than those who would not remarry the same person: 6. Single, married and remarried individuals have greater dyadic consensus satisfaction than those who were divorced or separated; 7. single, married and remarried individuals have greater dyadic consensus satisfaction than those who were divorced or separated; 8. single, married and remarried individuals have greater total or dyadic adjustment than those who were divorced or separated.

Rights

Copyright 1997 Stephen P. Rains

Comments

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