Master's Theses

Date of Award

Spring 1997

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Social Work

Advisor

Bill Daley

Abstract

The purpose of the researcher was to investigate college student’s knowledge of and attitudes toward HIV/AIDS. The sample consisted of 195 undergraduate students. The following independent variables were investigated: age, gender, classification, grade point average, number of sex partners within the last year, ethnic background, and sources of HIV/AIDS information. The dependent variables were scores from the subscales of the Factor Analytically Based Survey for Measuring AIDS Knowledge and Attitudes and Knowledge of AIDS. Five composite null hypotheses were tested at the .0500 level of significance. A three-way analysis of variance (general liner model) was employed for all null hypotheses. A total of 122 comparisons were made plus 82 recurring. Of the 122 comparisons, 42 were for main effects and 80 were for interactions. The results of the present study supported the following generalizations: 1. Individuals with grade point averages below 2.00 have greater Perceived Disease Severity than those with grade point averages above 2.00. 2. Female students have more knowledge of AIDS than male students. 3. Sophomores and juniors have a greater Desire for AIDS Information than freshmen and seniors. 4. Individuals who reported using newspapers, television, and lectures have more knowledge of AIDS than individuals who used other sources. 5. Students age 22-23 have more Perceived Personal Vulnerability than any other age group. 6. Students who have had 2 or more sex partners within the last year have greater Perceived Personal Vulnerability than students with 0 to 1 sex partner within the last year. 7. Students who have had 4 or more sex partners within the last year have greater Perceived Disease Severity than students with less than 3 sex partners with in the last year. 8. Grade point average and classification should be examined concurrently for the dependent variable Perceived Personal Vulnerability. 9. Gender and grade point average should be examined concurrently for the dependent variable Prevention Effectiveness. 10. Gender, classification, and sources of HIV/AIDS information should be examined concurrently for the dependent variable Perceived Personal Vulnerability. 11. Gender and sources of HIV/AIDS information should be examined concurrently for the dependent variable Perceived Disease Severity. 12. Classification and sources of HIV/AIDS information should be examined concurrently for the dependent variable Perceived Disease Severity. 13. Gender, classification, and sources of HIV/AIDS information should be examined concurrently for the dependent variable Perceived Disease Severity. 14. Gender and grade point average should be examined concurrently for the dependent variable Perceived Personal Vulnerability, and 15. Grade point average and sources of HIV/AIDS Information should be examined concurrently for the dependent variable Desire for AIDS information.

Rights

Copyright 1997 Stephanie L. Greenleaf

Comments

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