Master's Theses

Date of Award

Summer 1996

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Social Work

Advisor

Bill Daley

Abstract

The purpose of the researcher was to investigate the effects of the implementation of a modified block schedule in a Junior/Senior High School setting. The sample size included 152 subjects. The independent variables investigated included gender, grade classification, socioeconomic status, academic achievement, and type of schedule. The dependent variables were reflected in scores from a School Satisfaction Questionnaire, compilation of attendance statistics, and performance in the classroom as measured by grade point average (GPA). Covariant measures used included total battery raw scores from the California Test of Basic Skills, composite raw scores from the 1995 PLAN test, Academic Ability standard scores from the 1995 ASVAB test, grade point average (GPA) from the 1994-1995 academic school year, and attendance from the 1994-1995 academic school year. Thirteen composite null hypotheses were tested at the .05 level. Ten composite null hypotheses were tested with analysis of covariance. Three composite null hypotheses were tested using three-way analysis of variance. One post hoc composite null hypothesis was tested with analysis of covariance. A total of 25 comparisons were made plus 7 recurring. Of the 25 comparisons, 15 were for main effects and 10 were interactions. Of the 15 main effects 5 were statistically significant at the .05 level. Of the 10 interactions none were statistically significant at the .05 level. The results of the present study appeared to support the following generalizations: 1. Modified Block Scheduling was more effective in terms of grade point average for 8th & 9th grade female students than 8th and 9th grade male students, 2. Modified Block Scheduling was more effective in terms of grade point average for 8th and 9th grade students who paid full price for school lunches than for 8th and 9th grade students who received reduced or free lunches, 3. Modified Block Scheduling was more effective in terms of grade point average for 11th grade male students than for 11th grade female students, 4. Modified Block Scheduling was more effective in terms of grade point average for 11th and 12th grade students than for 8th and 9th grade students, 5. Modified Block Scheduling was more effective in terms of grade point average for 10th grade students than for 9th grade students, and 6. Modified Block Scheduling was more effective in terms of attendance for 8th, 9th and 10th grade students than for 12th grade students.

Rights

Copyright 1996 Deborah D. Haneke

Comments

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