Master's Theses

Date of Award

Fall 1996

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Social Work

Advisor

Bill Daley

Abstract

The purpose of the researcher was to investigate academic achievement and freshman to sophomore year retention rates. The independent variables investigated were: Pell Grant eligibility, gender, and age, and ACT composite score. The dependent variables were college grade point average (GPA) and freshman to sophomore year retention rates. The sample consisted of 1206 students, including 610 females and 596 males. Two composite null hypotheses were tested employing three-way analysis of variance (general linear model). One composite null hypothesis was tested employing a single-factor analysis of covariance. Four composite null hypotheses were tested employing a z-test for independent proportions. A total of 47 comparisons plus 18 recurring comparisons were made. Of the 47 comparisons, 19 were for main effects and 28 were for interactions. Of the 19 main effects, 14 were statistically significant at the .05 level. Five of the statistically significant main effects were for gender and the dependent variable GPA for Falls 1992-1995 individually and combined. Five of the statistically significant main effects were for ACT composite score and the dependent variable GPA for Falls 1992-1995 individually and combined. Four of the statistically significant main effects were for Pell Grant eligibility and the dependent variable freshman to sophomore year retention rates for Fall 1993, Fall 1994, Fall 1995, and Falls 1992-1995. Of the 28 interactions, none were statistically significant at the .05 level. The results of the present study appeared to support the following generalizations: 1. Female college freshmen have higher GPAs than male college freshmen, 2. College freshmen with ACT composite scores of 20 and above have higher GPAs than college freshmen with ACT composite scores below 20, and 3. College freshmen who are eligible for a Pell Grant have higher freshman to sophomore year retention rates than college freshmen who are not eligible for a Pell Grant.

Rights

Copyright 1966 Philip D. Covington

Comments

Notice: This material may be protected by copyright law (Title 17 U.S. Code).

Off Campus FHSU Users Click Here

Share

COinS