Master's Theses

Date of Award

Summer 1994

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Social Work

Advisor

Bill Daley

Abstract

The purpose of the researcher was to investigate the attributes which college students use to describe a desired mate or relationship needs. The sample consisted of 108 students, of which 58 were females and 50 were males. The following independent variables were investigated, gender, age, relationship status, and family structure. The dependent variables were the scores from the following subscales: Attractiveness, Personality Traits, Affection/communication, Sexual Fulfillment, Recreation/Social, Values/Religion, Education/Career, Family/Domestic Support, Female Primary Love Needs, and Male Primary Love Needs. Four composite null hypotheses were tested at the .05 level. A three-way analysis of variance (general linear model) was employed for each composite null hypothesis. A total of 140 comparisons were made plus 140 recurring comparisons. Of the 140 comparisons, 40 were for main effects and 100 were for interactions. Of the 40 comparisons for main effects, 9 were statistically significant at the .05 level. Of the 100 comparisons for interactions, 10 were statistically significant at the .05 level. The results of the present study appeared to support the following generalizations: 1. Attractiveness is more important to younger students than older students; 2. Family/Domestic Support is more important to females than males; 3. Female Primary Love Needs are more important to females than males; 4. Personality Traits are more important to students who have never dated or are not dating than to those who are casually dating; exclusively dating; engaged, living together, newlyweds; or longer married, separated , divorced, or widowed; 5. values/Religion is more important to students raised in intact families than to those raised in other family structures; 6. Male Primary Love Needs are more important to females than males; 7. Personality Traits are more important to students raised in intact families than to those raised in other family structures; 8. Statistically significant interactions for gender, age, and Sexual Fulfillment; gender, relationship status, and Values/Religion ; gender, family structure, and Affection/Communication; gender, age, and Values/Religion; gender, relationship status, and Affection/ Communication; gender, relationship status , family structure, and Affection/communication; relationship status, family structure, and Affection/communication; relationship status, family structure, and Family/Domestic Support ; age, relationship status, family structure, and Family/Domestic Support; and age, relationship status, family structure, and Female Primary Love Needs.

Rights

Copyright 1994 Debra Faye Martin

Comments

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