Master's Theses

Date of Award

Spring 1994

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Social Work

Advisor

Bill Daley

Abstract

The purpose of the researcher was to investigate the career maturity of welfare recipients. The following six independent variables were investigated: race, sex, age, level of formal education, general intelligence, and locus of control. Dependent variables were scores from the following five scales of the Career Maturity Inventory - Attitude Scale Counseling Form B-1: Decisiveness, Involvement, Independence, Orientation, and Compromise. The sample consisted of 83 welfare recipients who were eligible for the Job Opportunities and Basic Skills (JOBS) program in a Midwestern state. Five composite null hypotheses were tested at the .05 level of significance employing a three-way analysis of variance (general linear model). A total of 100 comparisons were made plus 75 recurring. Of the 100 comparisons made, 30 were for main effects and 70 for interactions. Of the 30 main effects, 6 were statistically significant at the .05 level. Of the 70 interactions, 5 were statistically significant at the .05 level. The results of the present study appeared to support the following generalizations: 1. Individuals with internal locus of control are more mature in Decisiveness, 2. Individuals with internal locus of control are more mature in Orientation, 3. Females are more mature in Involvement than males, 4. Individuals with general intelligence (91 to100) are more mature in Orientation, 5. Individuals with general intelligence (91 to 100) are more mature in Compromise, and 6. Significant interactions for (a) The independent variables general intelligence and locus of control for the dependent variable Involvement, (b) The independent variables formal education, general intelligence, and locus of control for the dependent variable Involvement, (c) The independent variables formal education and age for the dependent variable Decisiveness, (d) The independent variables race, sex, and general intelligence for the dependent variable Independence, and (e) The independent variables race and sex for the dependent variable Orientation.

Rights

Copyright 1994 Carol M. Beckman

Comments

Notice: This material may be protected by copyright law (Title 17 U.S. Code).

Off Campus FHSU Users Click Here

Share

COinS