Master's Theses

Date of Award

Spring 1993

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Psychology

Advisor

Bill Daley

Abstract

The purpose of the researcher was to investigate the effectiveness of group activities designed to modify motivational orientation and learning strategies in selected college athletes. The independent variables were the following: participation status, cumulative grade point average; classification; class attendance; times absent from classes; self-concept; and time spent in study. The dependent variables were scores from the scales of the Motivation for Learning Questionnaire. Pretest scores from the same scales of the Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire were employed as covariant variable. The instruments utilized were the Demographic Background Form, the Personal Attribute Inventory, and the Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire. The sample consisted of 58 students enrolled in varsity athletics. The experimental group consisted of 20 male students and the control group consisted of 38 male and female students. A pretest-posttest group control design was employed. Six composite null hypotheses were tested using a single-factor analysis of covariance. Of the 90 comparisons made, 7 were statistically significant at the .05 level. The results of the present study appeared to support the following generalizations: 1. Participation in group activities is associated with an increase in Control Beliefs and Peer Learning. 2. Cumulative grade point average is associated with Test Anxiety and Organization. 3. Student college classification is associated with Task Value and Elaboration. 4. Self-concept is associated with Control Beliefs. The results from the significant main effects indicated the following: 1. Those who participated had a significantly smaller mean Control Belief score than the nonparticipant; 2. Those who participated had a significantly larger mean Peer Learning score than the nonparticipant; 3. Those who reported a cumulative GPA of 2.0 or below had a significantly larger mean Test Anxiety score than those who reported a cumulative GPA of 2.1 to 2.5; 4. Those who reported a cumulative GPA of 2.6 and above had a significantly higher mean Test Anxiety score than those reporting a cumulative GPA of 2.1 to 2.5; 5. Those reporting a cumulative GPA of 2.1 to 2.5 had a significantly higher mean Organization score than those reporting a cumulative GPA of 2.6 and above and those reporting a cumulative GPA of 2.0 or below; 6. Freshmen and juniors had a significantly larger mean Task Value score than sophomores; 7. Juniors had a significantly larger mean Elaboration score than freshmen and sophomores; 8. Those who had a higher and lower self-concept scores had significantly higher mean Control Belief scores than those who had intermediate self-concept scores.

Rights

Copyright 1993 Genevieve R. Hagerman

Comments

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