Master's Theses

Date of Award

Spring 1992

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Social Work

Advisor

Bill Daley

Abstract

The purpose of the researcher was to investigate the effects of a read-aloud program. Type of instruction, gender, family structure and perception of family were the independent variables investigated. The dependent variables were Reading Vocabulary, Reading Comprehension, and Reading Total from the Science Research Associates test. Prescores on the Science Research Test (S.R.A.) were employed as the covariate measure. The sample consisted of 43 children from the fourth grade. The school read-aloud group consisted of 19 children; 14 children participated in the home read-aloud group, and there were 10 children in the control group. A pretest/posttest three group design was employed. Six composite null hypotheses were tested employing a one-way analysis of covariance. A total of 18 comparisons were made. Of the 18 comparisons, 3 were statistically significant at the .05 level. The significant comparisons were the following: school read-aloud group and Reading Vocabulary, school read-aloud group and Reading Total, and gender and Total Score for the home group. The results of the following study appear to support the following generalizations: 1. Participants in a read-aloud program who are read to by a teacher at school benefitted more from a read-aloud program than a control group. 2. Girls who were read-aloud to by parents achieved more than boys. 3. No association between a read-aloud program implemented in the child's home and reading achievement. 4. No association between gender and reading achievement in a read-aloud program implemented at school. 5. No association between family structure and reading achievement in a read-aloud program. 6. No association between perception of family and a read-aloud program. The significant main effects indicated the following: 1. Those who participated in the school read-aloud group had significantly higher scores than the control group for the dependent variable Reading Vocabulary. 2. Those who participated in the school read-aloud program had significantly higher scores than the control group for the dependent variable Reading Total. 3. Girls who participated in the home read-aloud program had significantly higher achievement for the dependent variable Reading Total.

Rights

Copyright 1992 Kelli B. Wright

Comments

Notice: This material may be protected by copyright law (Title 17 U.S. Code).

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