Master's Theses

Date of Award

Spring 1936

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Biology

Advisor

Dr. H.B. Reed

Abstract

It has been customary in writing theses dealing with taxonomic problems to collect data from an entire county. Having had occasion to collect botanical specimens from the Tasco Lake for work in biology at the Sheridan High School, the wealth of plant life to be found here became apparent. The area ranges from xerophytic forms on the uplands to the hydrophytic forms in the lake and marshes. Many of the latter have never been reported from Western Kansas. Collections in preserving fluid were made of the water forms found and specimens of the landforms were mounted on regulation-sized sheets properly classified. Duplicate specimens of both were presented to the Botany Department of the Fort Hays Kansas State College. The investigation covering a period of twenty months, comprising the growing seasons of 1934 and 1930, has made possible a thorough study of the flora of this region . So far as is known , no detailed study has been made of this area; and , moreover, this will hold for most of western Kansas, which therefore presents a fertile field for the investigator. It can be said without question that Western Kansas botanical studies have been very few and that much in the way of valuable botanical research is now needed . The result is that many erroneous ideas are prevalent in other states in regard to our plains region. This is due to the lack of scientific information based upon careful study . In all probability there is no other half section in Western Kansas where plant life would be any more constant and represent so large a number of species as the one reported upon in this thesis. This is due mainly to the topography, types of soil, and abundant water supply as a result of the perpetual springs and the 6.5-acre lake completed in 1925. The survey of plant life of this particular area was taken for the following reasons: (1) to add to the information concerning the taxonomy of Western Kansas plant life; (2) to make a n intensive study of a small area where there is an abundance and wide variety of xerophytic, mesophytic, and hydrophytic plant life.

Rights

Copyright 1936 Raymond W. Darland

Library Call Number

LD2652 .T5 B6 D37 1935

Comments

Notice: This material may be protected by copyright law (Title 17 U.S. Code).

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