Master's Theses

Date of Award

Summer 1992

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Biology

Advisor

Jerry R. Choate

Abstract

Habitat breadths and associations of five species of rodents were estimated in macrohabitats characterized by ground cover and vegetation cover in southeastern Colorado. The northern grasshopper mouse (Onychomys leucogaster) was categorized as a generalist in the use of both ground cover and vegetation cover; it can use alternative macrohabitats in the event of macrohabitat disturbance. Although Ord's kangaroo rat (Dipodomys ordii) was a generalist with respect to ground cover, it was unable to use alternative forms of vegetation cover to the extent that the deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus) and northern grasshopper mouse can. The spotted ground squirrel (Spermophilus spilosoma) was a specialist with respect to ground cover but a moderate generalist with respect to vegetation cover. The distribution of the deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus) likely is determined by interactions with other species although it was a moderate generalist with respect to ground cover and a generalist with respect to vegetation cover. The pinyon mouse (Peromyscus truei) was categorized as a macrohabitat specialist with respect to both ground cover and vegetation cover and would be unable to use alternative macrohabitats in the event of a macrohabitat disturbance. Based on habitat breadths and associations, the effects of macrohabitat alteration are predicted. The measures of habitat breadth reported herein likely are valid only in rangeland, shrubland, and woodland habitats in southeastern Colorado.

Rights

Copyright 1992 Robert R. Harms

Comments

Notice: This material may be protected by copyright law (Title 17 U.S. Code).

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