Master's Theses

Date of Award

Fall 1991

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Psychology

Advisor

Thomas T. Jackson

Abstract

Kirton's Adaption-Innovation Theory of cognitive style and the Kirton Adaption Innovation Inventory (KAI) have been applied to organizational settings, but they have not previously been utilized in clinical psychology. The KAI and Adaption-Innovation Theory may have implications for the scientist/practitioner model of training for clinical psychologists. The purpose of this study was to explore relationships between cognitive styles of therapists, clients, and various dimensions of therapy. This study also examined the cognitive climate of the clinical psychology environment, in terms of adaption-innovation theory. The Counselor Rating Form-Short version (CRF-S) was used as a dependent measure in this study. The CRF-S instructions were altered so that therapists were able to rate clients in terms of expertness, trustworthiness, and attractiveness. The implications and psychometric properties of this altered version of the CRF-S were explored. The subjects were clients and therapists at the Kelly Psychological Service Center at Fort Hays State University. There were seven therapists and 31 clients. The KAI and outcome measures were administered to therapists and clients prior to therapy. The outcome measures were the Current Adjustment Rating Scale (CARS), an altered form of the CARS (CARS client form), the Patient Global Outcome Rating (PGOR), and the Therapist Global Outcome Rating (TGOR). The CRF-S, CRF-S (altered version), and therapy outcome measures were administered prior to the fourth session of therapy. Data were analyzed by analyses of variance, multiple correlations, regression analyses, and internal reliability coefficients. Therapist and client KAI scores were the independent variables and the CRF-S, CRF-S (altered version), and therapy outcome measures were dependent variables. A nonsignificant main effect was expected between Adapter and Innovator therapists on all of the dependent measures, except the trustworthiness factor on both versions of the CRF- S. A significant interaction was predicted between cognitive styles of the clients and therapists on all of the dependent measures, except the trustworthiness factor of both versions of the CRF-S. The nonsignificant main effect that was expected between Adaptor and Innovator therapists on all dependent measures did occur. The predicted significant interaction between the cognitive styles of the clients and therapists on all the dependent measures did not occur. Post-hoc analyses that were carried out in this study are also presented and discussed.

Rights

Copyright 1991 James S. Sommer

Comments

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