Master's Theses

Date of Award

Fall 1991

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Communication Studies

Advisor

Willis M. Watt

Abstract

The purpose of this thesis was to identify and analyze the interpersonal-relationship principles and applications presented by the New Testament and to suggest how those principles and applications might best impact the field of interpersonal communication. Those passages in the New Testament Gospels and Pauline Epistles to the churches which explicitly speak to relationships and relational behaviors were examined for content. The results were presented for observation and were analyzed for contribution to the field of Interpersonal communication. Four areas were discussed. (1) Openness to others was taught in the New Testament as a quality of character often delineated as gentleness. (2) The practice of mutual submission as a specific application of this gentleness was called for in every kind of relationship. (3) The principle of love had its foundation in the character of God and presented a more concrete yardstick for behavior: "Treat others in the way you would like to be treated.” (4) The healing practice of forgiveness was a significant issue in the New Testament's relational teaching. The overall impact of the results was felt in the portrayal of a predominately other-centered life style. The frequent appearance of this life style was most challenging.

Rights

Copyright 1991 Bruce C. Hemphill

Comments

Notice: This material may be protected by copyright law (Title 17 U.S. Code).

Off Campus FHSU Users Click Here

Share

COinS