Master's Theses

Date of Award

Fall 1990

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Social Work

Advisor

Bill Daley

Abstract

The purpose of the researcher was to investigate quality of effort, place of residence, perception of the environment and students' opinions of college. Seven independent variables were investigated: personal and social development, general education, literature, and arts, intellectual skills, understanding science/technology, vocation, perception of environment and place of residence. Two dependent variables were employed, satisfaction and initiative/benefits. The College Student Experiences (CSE) questionnaire was used for 196 full-time students at a four-year university. Five composite null hypotheses were tested using 3 x 3 x 3 factorial designs. Forty-two comparisons plus 28 recurring were made. Of the 42 comparisons 14 were for main effects and 28 were for interactions. Of the 14 main effects 2 were statistically significant at the .05 level. The two significant main effects were: vocation and the dependent variable satisfaction and intellectual skills and the dependent variable initiative/benefits. Two of the 28 interactions were significant at the .05 level. The two significant interactions were: personal and social development with intellectual skills for the dependent variable satisfaction and personal and social development with intellectual skills f o r the dependent variable initiative/benefits. The following generalizations were supported: 1. Intermediate and high vocation scores were associated with greater satisfaction than low vocation scores. 2. High intellectual skills were associated with higher initiative/benefits than low intellectual skills. 3. The numerically highest satisfaction was reported by subjects who had high personal and social development and high intellectual skills. The numerically lowest satisfaction was reported by subjects with intermediate personal and social development and high intellectual skills. 4. The numerically highest initiative/benefits were reported by subjects who had low personal and social development and high intellectual skills. The numerically lowest initiative/benefits were reported by subjects who had low personal and social development and low intellectual skills. 5. Independent variables not associated with either dependent variable were: understanding science/technology, perception of environment, place of residence, and general education, literature, and arts.

Rights

Copyright 1990 Barbara Elaine Thoman

Comments

Notice: This material may be protected by copyright law (Title 17 U.S. Code).

Off Campus FHSU Users Click Here

Share

COinS