Master's Theses

Date of Award

Spring 1988

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Social Work

Advisor

Bill Daley

Abstract

The purpose of the researcher was to examine university students’ knowledge of alcoholism. The total sample consisted of 153 students from a small Midwest university. The students participating in the study included 112 females and 41 males, 29 who were freshmen, 44 sophomores, 39 juniors, and 41 who were seniors. Five independent variables were investigated: 1) gender, 2) age, 3) group predisposition, 4) grade point average, and 5) college classification. The dependent variable was knowledge of alcoholism. Knowledge of alcoholism was divided into the following three subparts to more specifically test university students’ knowledge: 1) identification, 2) Alcoholism Family Implications, and 3) Alcoholism Recovery Implications. The instrument used to test for knowledge of alcoholism was developed by the researcher using materials from various authors. A pilot study was conducted in order to delineate the best questions. A three group status survey design was employed using pre-designated groups. Five null hypotheses were tested on a total knowledge score plus each of the three knowledge of alcoholism subparts. Thirteen of the 20 main effects and two interactions were significant at the .05 level. The results of this study appeared to support the following generalizations: 1) female students possessed a greater knowledge of alcoholism. 2) Students who were older possessed a greater knowledge of alcoholism. 3) Predisposition had no effect upon Identification and Family Implications knowledge of alcoholism. 4) Students with no predisposition possessed less knowledge of alcoholism pertaining to Recovery Implications and Total score than students with a non-treated or treated pre-disposition. 5) Students with a grade point average above 3.25 possessed more knowledge of alcoholism for the Identification and Family Implications components than students with a grade point average below 2.75. 6) Students with a grade point average above 3.25 possessed more knowledge of alcoholism for the Recovery Implications and Total score components than students with a grade point average 3.25 and below. 7) There was no relationship between college classification and students’ knowledge of alcoholism.

Rights

Copyright 1988 Roger L. Ochs

Comments

Notice: This material may be protected by copyright law (Title 17 U.S. Code).

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