Master's Theses

Date of Award

Spring 1987

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Social Work

Advisor

Bill Daley

Abstract

The purpose of the researcher was to investigate the effectiveness of planned career awareness activities and unisexual occupational activities for second graders. The subjects of this study consisted of 78 second grade students representing two different schools. Three groups were established. The implementation group, Group 1 participated in planned career awareness activities and unisexual occupational activities prepared by the researcher. Groups 2 and 3 were used as the control group and did not participate in the activities. A pretest and post test design for two groups and three groups was employed. The scores from the following instruments were employed: Career Awareness Inventory and the Occupational Sex-Stereotyping Inventory. Seven of the dependent measures employed were scores from the Career Awareness Inventory. The eighth dependent measure employed was scores from the Occupational Sex-Stereotyping Inventory. Sex-class and group membership were employed as independent variables. Analysis of covariance with pretest scores as covariants was used for data analysis. The analysis consisted of testing four null hypotheses. Two of the four hypotheses were rejected. A total of 16 comparisons were made and four were statistically significant. Statistically significant differences were found between the implementation group and control groups scores on three subparts of the Career Awareness Inventory. Those subparts were models, function and prestige. The differences between pretest and adjusted post test scores for the group which received unisexual occupational activities were also significantly different than those of the control groups. All four hypotheses were tested at the .05 level of significance. The following results were indicated: 1. the planned career awareness activities made a difference in the dependent variables models, function and prestige. 2. Instruction was equally effective for girls and boys. 3. Instruction led to less stereotyping. 4. The planned unisexual occupational activities were equally effective for girls and boys.

Rights

Copyright 1987 Lavonda L. Eichman

Comments

Notice: This material may be protected by copyright law (Title 17 U.S. Code).

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