Master's Theses

Date of Award

Summer 1986

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Social Work

Advisor

Bill Daley

Abstract

The research was designed to investigate risk taking behavior of military and non-military fifth grade children. The subjects consisted of 99 fifth grade students enrolled in four schools from the following areas: military, Air Force base; low economic, blue collar; suburban, middle class; and, farming, small town rural. The researcher developed and administered a 10 item risk taking instrument; in addition, the Piers-Harris Children's Self-Concept Scale was used. Three null hypotheses were tested. Sex class, four types of schools, and the scores from the six factors of the Piers-Harris Children's Self-Concept Scale were designated as the independent variables. Scores from the risk taking instrument were the dependent variable. The hypotheses were tested using the following: a one-way analysis of variance, t-test for independent data sets, and a t-test for Pearsonian product-moment correlation coefficients. Hypothesis one was not rejected; the results of the study indicated there were no differences among the types of schools attended and reported risk taking behavior. The results from this hypothesis also indicated no statistically significant difference between military and non-military children in reported risk taking behavior. Hypothesis two was not rejected; there was no reported difference between male and female subject's mean scores on the risk taking instrument. Null hypothesis three was rejected since there were statistically significant correlation coefficients between the Piers-Harris Children's Self-Concept Scale factors and the risk taking instrument. The following generalizations appear to be supported after reviewing the results of the study. There were no reported differences in risk taking behavior among the socio-economic groups. Also, there was no reported difference between military and non-military children in risk taking behavior. However, three factors from the Piers-Harris Children's Self-Concept Scale scores generated significant correlation coefficients with the risk taking instrument scores for the military dependent children. It should be noted there were no significant correlation coefficients with the factors of the Piers-Harris Children's Self-Concept Scale scores and risk taking instrument scores for any other group of children. Finally, there was no reported difference between males and females in risk taking behavior.

Rights

Copyright 1986 Joyce Horyna Harting

Comments

Notice: This material may be protected by copyright law (Title 17 U.S. Code).

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