Master's Theses

Date of Award

Fall 1986

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Social Work

Advisor

Bill Daley

Abstract

A sample of 53 chronic mentally ill subjects were studied to assess self-concept. Seven null hypotheses were tested at the .05 level of significance using 10 scales from the Tennessee Self-Concept Scale (TSCS) as dependent variables. The 10 scales employed were total P, self-criticism, identity, self satisfaction, behavior, physical self, moral-ethical self, personal self, family self and social self. The four independent variables investigated were: (1) chronic mentally ill, (2) amount of formal education, (3) sex class membership and (4) the three diagnostic categories personality disorders, schizophrenic disorders, and affective disorders. The questions from the TSCS were recorded on tape and played back to the participants of the study. The participants were divided into three groups and were administered the instrument at separate times. The study resulted in all seven of the null hypotheses being rejected as a result of at least one of the dependent variables tested being statistically significant at the .05 level. The following generalizations appeared to be supported by the results of this study: (1) The chronic mentally ill have a lower self-concept than the norm population, (2) those individuals with a chronic personality disorder had a lower self-concept than the norm population, (3) those individuals with a chronic schizophrenic disorder had a lower self-concept than the norm population, (4) those individuals with a chronic affective disorder had a lower self-concept than the norm population, (5) amount of formal education had no effect on self-concept except for the dependent variable self criticism for which those individuals without a high school education or the equivalent showed less ability for such, (6) sex class membership had no effect on self-concept except for the dependent variable personal worth in which females showed a significantly devalued concept of self and, (7) the diagnostic category of the chronic mentally ill had no effect on the self-concept except for the dependent variable family self on which those subjects in the affective disorder category seemed to have a more positive self concept than those subjects in the category of personality disorder or schizophrenic disorder.

Rights

Copyright 1986 David D. Green

Comments

Notice: This material may be protected by copyright law (Title 17 U.S. Code).

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