Master's Theses

Date of Award

Fall 1984

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Social Work

Advisor

Bill Daley

Abstract

The purpose of the researcher was to investigate family structure, family happiness, and children’s self concepts. Independent variables were family structure, family happiness, gender, and grade level. Five hypotheses were tested at the .05 level of significance. Two of the hypotheses were not rejected and three were rejected. The sample for this study consisted of 128 elementary school students, from second- through fifth-grade. Students were from two small towns in southern Kansas. Four instruments were used: Coopersmith Self-Esteem Inventory, Personal Attribute Inventory for Children - Self, Personal Attribute Inventory for Children - Family, and a Child’s Information Sheet. Results of this study indicated that a significant difference did exist between the mean self concepts of children from two different levels of family happiness (i.e., happy, unhappy). A significant difference was found in five of seven different arrangements tested: second-grade, fourth-grade, male, female, and total sample. No significant difference was found between the mean self concepts of children from two different family structures (i.e., intact, divorced). No significant difference was found between the mean perceived family happiness scores for children from two different family structures. The results of this study support the proposition that family happiness, as perceived by the child, is more important than family structure in the development of a positive self concept in children.

Rights

Copyright 1984 Robyn R. Chadwick

Comments

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