Master's Theses

Date of Award

Summer 1982

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Biology

Advisor

Robert Nicholson

Abstract

Behavior and some vegetative and edaphic influences of steers grazing under intensive early (IES) and season long stocking (SLS) was investigated in 1961 on two adjacent paddocks with yearling steers at the Fort Hays Branch Experiment Station, Hays, KS. Grazing under SLS occurred from 15 April to 15 Sept. at 1.5 steers/hectare (ha) and under IES from 15 April to 1 July at 4 .5 steers/ha. Observations were made simultaneously at 15 minute intervals for the two treatments from 05:30 to 21:45 during daylight and to 05:00 during 24 hr. period. The number of steers grazing, standing, lying, walking, and in other activities were recorded. Early in the season steers under SLS spent 8, 11, and 5; 8, 4, and 4 hours grazing, lying and in other activities in 24 hr. and daylight periods, respectively. Those under I ES spent 7, 11, and 7; 8, 4, and 4 hours grazing, lying and in other activities in 24 hr. and daylight periods, respectively. Over the season steers averaged 9, 4, and 4; 9, 11, and 4 hours grazing, lying and in other activities, during daylight and 24 hr. periods, respectively. Steers under SLS travelled 4 km/day early in the season in contrast to 5 km/day covered under IES. In July SLS had 42% higher density of forbs and 100 kg/ha more standing crop than IES. By September, IES had a higher density of forbs than under SLS and a standing crop that was about 250 kg/ha more than that under SLS. The bJ.lk density of the top 25 mm of soil under SLS was 10% more compacted than that under IES. Removal of animals under IES for the second half of the growing season enhanced both forbs and standing crop residue to a level equal or greater than SLS.

Rights

Copyright 1982 Maynard Lugenja

Comments

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