Master's Theses

Date of Award

Spring 1981

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Psychology

Advisor

Phyllis G. Tiffany

Abstract

This ex post facto study investigated the relationship between the presence of children and psychological stress in the post-divorce adjustment process. The post-divorce adjustment process was described as those changes in roles which are the result of divorce. Subjects were 30 divorced, unremarried women between the ages of 21 and 35. A two-group design was employed, with 15 subjects in each group. Women with children were assigned to the Children’s group and women with no children were assigned to the Non-Children’s group. Measures of psychological stress were collected from the two groups through administration of the Post-divorce Survey and the Heimler Scale of Social Functioning. Results showed that women with children in the post-divorce adjustment process experience greater psychological stress, as defined by lower current life satisfaction, than women without children. Results also showed that women making successful role alterations experience less psychological stress, as defined by higher current life satisfaction, than women not making successful role alterations. Finally, results showed that seeking profession counseling since the divorce and having older children significantly affected psychological stress, as defined by higher current life satisfaction, in the post-divorce adjustment process. No significant difference was found in the ratio of satisfaction to frustration between women with children and women without children in the amount of psychological stress experienced in the post-divorce adjustment process. Results also showed that neither social support nor increased health problems were significantly related to psychological stress in the post-divorce adjustment process. Professional counseling ever or a year or less prior to the divorce showed no significant relationship to psychological stress. Number of children, number of years married, social support, and socioeconomic status when married showed no significant relationship with psychological stress in the post-divorce adjustment process.

Rights

Copyright 1981 Patricia Tebo

Comments

Notice: This material may be protected by copyright law (Title 17 U.S. Code).

Off Campus FHSU Users Click Here

Share

COinS