Master's Theses

Date of Award

Summer 1980

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Psychology

Advisor

Thomas T. Jackson

Abstract

The present study was designed to investigate the relationship between level of commitment to a college course, and information pertaining to the cost of book(s) for the course, and how such variables would interact to affect the subsequent evaluation of the course/instructor. It was expected that a state of cognitive dissonance would be present between the high commitment-higher than average cost group and the low commitment-higher than average cost group, which would manifest itself by less favorable evaluations of the course/instructor by the low commitment-higher than average group, than in the other five experimental groups. Results partially supported the prediction. It was also found that a difference existed between the high commitment-lower than average cost group and the low commitment-lower than average cost group. Such a state of cognitive dissonance was apparently reduced by less favorable evaluations of the course/instructor by the high commitment-lower than average cost group, than by the low commitment-lower than average cost group. The results were discussed in terms of cognitive dissonance theory and suggestions were made as to how and why subjects reduced any dissonance aroused. Suggestions for future research were provided.

Rights

Copyright 1980 Gerald L. Stremel

Comments

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