Master's Theses

Date of Award

1979

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Psychology

Advisor

Robert Markley

Abstract

Subjects studied pictures of faces while making judgments of likeableness (semantic processing) or gender identification (sensory processing). In Experiment I, 6-year old boys and girls made one of the two required judgments and were subsequently tested on recognition accuracy. Eleven-year old boys and girls also made one of the two required judgments and were subsequently tested on recognition accuracy. Subject performance was compared for age, processing level, and sex. In Experiment II, additional groups of 11 year old boys and girls were given the same task of making one of the two required judgments, but exposure of the target faces was restricted in time. Performance was compared for exposure time, processing level, and sex. It was found that processing level instructions produced no overall effects; older children demonstrated superior facial recognition accuracy; longer exposure time increased facial recognition accuracy; and girls tended to demonstrate superior facial recognition accuracy. Possible explanations for these findings were offered and suggestions for future research were made.

Rights

Copyright 1979 Lynda Taylor

Comments

Notice: This material may be protected by copyright law (Title 17 U.S. Code).

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