Master's Theses

Department

Psychology

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Abstract

This study was designed to investigate if a student’s emotional adjustment in the “school” situation as measured by Experienced Control (EC) was a function of the method of instruction. The EC Scale was administered to 129 seventh and eighth grade students taught by “individualized instruction”, and to 134 seventh and eighth grade students in a second school being taught by “traditional group instruction”. The two groups of students were similar in social and demographical variables. This study hypothesized that students being taught by “individualized instruction” would have significantly higher self-directed external scores (OE) and significantly higher self-directed external scores (FE) than students being taught by “traditional group instruction”. It was hypothesized that eighth grade students would have significantly higher OE and FE scores than seventh grade students. It was further hypothesized that a comparison of EC Scale component values would be significant. The hypotheses concerning EC Scale components were supported. The predicted hypotheses concerning method of instruction and grade were not supported. Significant interactions were indicated for EC component OE when comparing Method of Instruction by Grade by Components. The interactions in this study suggested that EC component OE in the school situation was a function of method of instruction and grade.

Advisor

Phyllis G. Tiffany

Date of Award

Summer 1975

Document Type

Thesis - campus only access

Rights

©1975 Billy H. Clark

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