Date of Award

Summer 2012

Degree Name

Education Specialist (Ed.S)

Department

Advanced Education Programs

Advisor

Dr. Jennifer Bonds-Raacke

Abstract

Video self-modeling (VSM) is a type of intervention that has been developed to assist students in viewing themselves successfully in a wide variety of domains. Previous research regarding VSM states that it is beneficial to children with autism spectrum disorder and has helped them improve functioning in many settings. Specifically, VSM is useful to children with autism spectrum disorder because it minimizes attentional and hearing requirements, and allows the child to see themselves as they could be rather than as they currently are. Video modeling avoids reliance on social interactions or the presence of a therapist to promote learning. This reduction in the importance of social interactions may be particularly significant for children who struggle in social settings. Finally, motivation for watching television in general might increase interest in watching the video. The present study was designed to analyze the effects of VSM on children with autism spectrum disorder in an academic setting. The present study added to the literature by allowing classroom teachers to choose the area of academic behavior, thereby increasing social relevance. The present study examined the effects of VSM on children with autism spectrum disorder within a functional interrelated classroom. Specifically, the present study examined the effects of the implementation of VSM within the functional interrelated classroom and the potential it has to enable significant positive changes in on-task behavior and appropriate transitions. The study also examined the maintenance of on-task behavior and appropriate transitions within implementation of the VSM research. Also explored were the teachers’ perceptions of on-task behavior and appropriate transitions through surveys that were administered before implementation of VSM and upon completion of VSM. The sample of the current study was comprised of two participants who were enrolled within the functional interrelated classroom and diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder. The implementation of VSM within an academic setting proved to be successful and showed significant results in increasing on-task behavior with Student 1. Maintenance was also shown with this student. No significance was found with the Student 2 and increasing appropriate transitions; however an anomaly was discovered within one of the days VSM was implemented. With the removal of this anomaly, significance was found with the second student and increasing appropriate transitions. Despite the increase in appropriate transitions, maintenance was not established with the second student. The teachers’ perceptions from the administered survey revealed a significant increase in on-task behavior and appropriate transitions with the implementation of the VSM research. When investigating approaches appropriate for students with ASD, it is important to remember that some progress is significant. Implementation of VSM revealed progress with both students with ASD, at varying levels. It is also important to stress that small change for students with ASD may not occur without some difficulty, due to general resistance to changes in their schedules. Over the course of the seven weeks of implementation, small change was observed and can be considered a success in their academic setting.

Rights

Copyright 2012 Casey N. Schmidt

Library Call Number

LD2652 .F5 P7 S355 2012 c.1

Comments

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