Geosciences Faculty Publications
 

Source Publication

Procedia Computer Science

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

1-1-2018

Volume

139

First Page

95

Last Page

103

Rights

This material is protected by all applicable copyright laws.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

DOI

10.1016/j.procs.2018.10.223

Abstract

© 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. With the observed rise in temperature, many researchers have tried to identify the causes of such climate change to help mitigate its effects. The objective of this study is to determine whether, under the same carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) concentrations, CO 2 with lower cloud coverage would raise the temperature at a greater rate than CO 2 with higher cloud coverage. The hypothesis was tested through big data analysis and modeling. The relationships between the temperature and the CO 2 emissions, the temperature and the cloud coverage, and the CO 2 emissions and the cloud coverage were identified using the Pearson's correlation test. The data analysis concluded that the relationship between the temperature and the CO 2 emission is positively proportional with a significant correlation. The relationship between the cloud coverage and the temperature and the relationship between the CO 2 emissions and the cloud coverage were determined to be negatively proportional with significant correlations. For modeling, the temperature increased more rapidly as cloud coverage shrank. The results supported the hypothesis that the cloud coverage mitigates warming effects created by CO 2 emissions.

Comments

This article was originally published in Procedia Computer Science

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