Track and Field
 

Abstract

In the hammer throw, the exertion of the force necessary to increase the horizontal velocity of the implement is thought to take place mainly when both the thrower's feet are in contact with the ground during the double support phases of the turns. Coaches have therefore sought to maximize the duration and the effectiveness of the double-support phases while minimizing the length of the single-support phases, when it is ass1.1med that the thrower is preparing for the next double- support. However. as scientific Understanding of the event has developed things have become less clear. It is now known that the horizontal velocity of the hammer is increased mainly in the winds or early part of the throw, when the thrower is stationary or rotating slowly, and that the observed increase in velocity during the turns is due not ta a horizontal pull-push of the feet against the ground but to the addition of vertical velocity and a shortening of the hammer radius. Therefore, emphasis on the double-support phases may well be misplaced. Stressing that there is still much that is not known about the hammer throw, the author explains current understanding of the event in detail and makes recommendations for coaches to consider.

Document Type

Article

Source Publication

New Studies in Athletics

Version

Publisher's Version

Publication Date

1-1-2009

Volume

24

Issue

4

First Page

71

Last Page

80

Rights

Notice: This material may be protected by copyright law (Title 17 U.S. Code).

Comments

For questions contact ScholarsRepository@fhsu.edu

Share

COinS