Removing Barriers to Promote Parent Partnerships

Lyndie Glidewell, Fort Hays State University
Annette M. Fieger, Fort Hays State University
Byron Sturm, Fort Hays State University
Andrew Weese, Fort Hays State University

Description

Parent partnerships are ways for educational staff, especially those who work with children with disabilities, to connect with families of students in meaningful ways that not only guide the education of the student but also show acceptance, provide encouragement and continue support to students and families beyond the school environment. Partnerships may include more than just schools and parents; they often invite other family members, friends and the community to be involved. These types of relationships can be very important to students with special needs because, “when schools, parents, families, and communities work together to support learning, students tend to earn higher grades, attend school more regularly, stay in school longer, and enroll in higher-level programs.” (NEA Education Policy and Practice Department, 2008.) This poster will examine current data on parent partnerships and provide suggestions that can create stronger partnerships, as recommended by survey results and as discovered in literature review. The information will be used to establish or build upon partnerships within our current districts.

 

Removing Barriers to Promote Parent Partnerships

Parent partnerships are ways for educational staff, especially those who work with children with disabilities, to connect with families of students in meaningful ways that not only guide the education of the student but also show acceptance, provide encouragement and continue support to students and families beyond the school environment. Partnerships may include more than just schools and parents; they often invite other family members, friends and the community to be involved. These types of relationships can be very important to students with special needs because, “when schools, parents, families, and communities work together to support learning, students tend to earn higher grades, attend school more regularly, stay in school longer, and enroll in higher-level programs.” (NEA Education Policy and Practice Department, 2008.) This poster will examine current data on parent partnerships and provide suggestions that can create stronger partnerships, as recommended by survey results and as discovered in literature review. The information will be used to establish or build upon partnerships within our current districts.