Chemistry Faculty Publications
 

Authors

A. J. Weinheimer, National Center for Atmospheric Research
D. D. Montzka, National Center for Atmospheric Research
T. L. Campos, National Center for Atmospheric Research
J. G. Walega, National Center for Atmospheric Research
B. A. Ridley, National Center for Atmospheric Research
S. G. Donnelly, National Oceanic and Atmospheric AdministrationFollow
E. R. Keim, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
L. A. Del Negro, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
M. H. Proffitt, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
J. J. Margitan, National Aeronautics and Space Administration
K. A. Boering, Harvard University
A. E. Andrews, Harvard University
B. C. Daube, Harvard University
S. C. Wofsy, Harvard University
B. E. Anderson, NASA Langley Research Center
J. E. Collins, Science and Technology Corporation, Hampton
G. W. Sachse, NASA Langley Research Center
S. A. Vay, NASA Langley Research Center
J. W. Elkins, NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory
P. R. Wamsley, NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory
E. L. Atlas, National Center for Atmospheric Research
F. Flocke, National Center for Atmospheric Research
S. Schauffler, National Center for Atmospheric Research
C. R. Webster, National Aeronautics and Space Administration
R. D. May, National Aeronautics and Space Administration
M. Loewenstein, NASA Ames Research Center
J. R. Podolske, NASA Ames Research Center
T. P. Bui, NASA Ames Research Center
K. R. Chan, NASA Ames Research Center
S. W. Bowen, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center
M. R. Schoeberl, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center
L. R. Lait, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

Source Publication

Journal of Geophysical Research Atmospheres

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

9-20-1998

Volume

103

Issue

D17

First Page

22087

Last Page

22096

DOI

10.1029/98JD01421

Abstract

We compare measurements of six species taken aboard NASA DC-8 and ER-2 aircraft during two flight legs in the tropical middle troposphere near Hawaii. NO, NOy, O3, CH4, and N2O measurements agree to within the limits set by the known systematic errors. For CO2, which can be measured with better relative precision than the other five species, differences in measured values from the two platforms are slightly larger than expected if the air masses sampled by the two aircraft were indeed similar in CO2 composition to better than 0.08%. Copyright 1998 by the American Geophysical Union.

Comments

This article was originally published in Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres.

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