Date of Award

Spring 2016

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Psychology

Advisor

Dr. Janett Naylor- Tincknell

Abstract

The current study examined the perceptions of intimate partner violence. Data were gathered from Fort Hays State University undergraduate participants enrolled on campus and virtually. Participants were assigned to a four-level independent variable (scenario type). Participants were grouped according to their career goal, a two-level independent variable (helping profession and non-helping profession). This study suggests there are differences in perceptions among participants with differing career goals as they pertain to myth acceptance of IPV and homosexuality, and the type of punishment needed for aggressors of IPV. Helping professionals endorsed lower myth acceptance of IPV. There was no significant effect of scenario type. However, a significant difference was found between the FTF and FTM scenario type. No interaction existed between scenario type and myth acceptance of IPV. Helping professionals endorsed lower myth acceptance of homosexuality. There was no significant effect of scenario type and no interaction existed between scenario type and career goal. A significant relationship between career goal and perceptions of punishment for aggressors was found, suggesting participants with helping profession career goals are more likely to endorse higher levels of punishment for aggressors. A significant relationship between career goal and perceptions of severity was not found, suggesting perceptions of severity are fairly consistent among career goals. Limitations and future research are also discussed.

Rights

Copyright 2016 Shelby M. Staab

Library Call Number

LD2652 .T5 P7 S733 2016

Comments

Notice: This material may be protected by copyright law (Title 17 U.S. Code).

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Psychology Commons

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