Department

Art and Design

Award

3rd Non-Empirical Faculty

Classification

Faculty/Staff

Description

Exploring porcelain claybodies and gold as a surface embellishment as a way of adding value to ceramic art was the focus of our research and creative activity. Researchers visited museums, attended curatorial lectures, and participated in workshops. Investigators applied the results of this research to personal artworks, increasing value, enhancing skillsets and material understanding. All research was documented and participants developed professional portfolios. Acceptance into juried competitions, a solo exhibition during the national Ceramics conference in Kansas City, and a community exhibition during the Hays Spring Gallery Walk offered venues for sharing the creative activity enriched by this research. Claybodies were tested for shrinkage, porosity, plasticity, translucency, glaze compatibility and standing strength. Results were compared and the investigators applied their findings to one of a kind artworks exploiting the characteristics of each clay body. Gold is an expensive, relatively rare and precious material used in embellishing ceramic surfaces. A variety of gold applications were demonstrated and explored. Gold luster was applied with brushes and ink pens to create linear drawings. Gold decal images and patterns were applied to embellish surfaces enriching the glazes. Gold leaf known as gilt was added to surfaces that did not require firing. Traveling to learn from experts, inviting artists onto campus to teach their techniques, exploring and incorporating research findings into artistic practice has advanced the art of all investigators. The resulting artwork will be shared with the campus, community and global community through exhibitions and virtual display.

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Value Added: Exploring Porcelain and Gold in Ceramic Art

Exploring porcelain claybodies and gold as a surface embellishment as a way of adding value to ceramic art was the focus of our research and creative activity. Researchers visited museums, attended curatorial lectures, and participated in workshops. Investigators applied the results of this research to personal artworks, increasing value, enhancing skillsets and material understanding. All research was documented and participants developed professional portfolios. Acceptance into juried competitions, a solo exhibition during the national Ceramics conference in Kansas City, and a community exhibition during the Hays Spring Gallery Walk offered venues for sharing the creative activity enriched by this research. Claybodies were tested for shrinkage, porosity, plasticity, translucency, glaze compatibility and standing strength. Results were compared and the investigators applied their findings to one of a kind artworks exploiting the characteristics of each clay body. Gold is an expensive, relatively rare and precious material used in embellishing ceramic surfaces. A variety of gold applications were demonstrated and explored. Gold luster was applied with brushes and ink pens to create linear drawings. Gold decal images and patterns were applied to embellish surfaces enriching the glazes. Gold leaf known as gilt was added to surfaces that did not require firing. Traveling to learn from experts, inviting artists onto campus to teach their techniques, exploring and incorporating research findings into artistic practice has advanced the art of all investigators. The resulting artwork will be shared with the campus, community and global community through exhibitions and virtual display.