Date of Award

2008

Document Type

Research Paper

Degree Name

Master of Liberal Studies (MLS)

Abstract

The Romance of Oppression: Racism and Sexism in Gone with the Wind At the age of ten, I read my first “adult” novel, Margaret Mitchell’s Gone with the Wind. I was captivated from the moment I opened the cracked “leatherette” cover and read the fateful words, “Scarlett O’Hara was not beautiful, but men seldom realized it when caught by her charms as the Tarleton twins were” (Mitchell 1). I spent every spare moment of the next week lost in the world of plantation belles and dashing rogues, convinced that not only was Rhett Butler the greatest man in the history of the world, but that Scarlett O’Hara had to be my maternal great-grandmother (she had the same last name, after all). For the next year, the book was seldom out of my possession, as I devoured Scarlett’s adventures again and again. For good or ill, Gone with the Wind (known to its admirers as GWTW) ignited my lifelong passion for both historical fiction and genuine history.

Rights

Copyright 2008 Cynthia Martin

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